Last edited by Kit
Saturday, November 21, 2020 | History

1 edition of How to design & teach using outcomes found in the catalog.

How to design & teach using outcomes

How to design & teach using outcomes

  • 248 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by Scarborough Board of Education in Scarborough, Ont .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Competency-based education -- Ontario -- Scarborough.,
  • Curriculum planning -- Ontario -- Scarborough.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesHow to design and teach using outcomes
    Statement[written and edited by, Joan Barrett ... et al].
    ContributionsBarrett, Joan., Scarborough Board of Education
    The Physical Object
    Pagination1 v. (various pagings) :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17285578M


Share this book
You might also like
Mountain

Mountain

The dramatic works of William Shakespeare

The dramatic works of William Shakespeare

wayfarer in Portugal

wayfarer in Portugal

Red Justice

Red Justice

Sing-song

Sing-song

Our magnificent bastard tongue the untold history of English

Our magnificent bastard tongue the untold history of English

Phish

Phish

Antique jewellery

Antique jewellery

Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements in the Eighties

Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements in the Eighties

Teaching, learning, & planetary exploration

Teaching, learning, & planetary exploration

On the semantics of the relational data model

On the semantics of the relational data model

progress of Platos progress.

progress of Platos progress.

Antibiotics

Antibiotics

The paleo healing cookbook

The paleo healing cookbook

Croquêt, a Macaulay flower (which cant be beet)

Croquêt, a Macaulay flower (which cant be beet)

Two-gun vengeance.

Two-gun vengeance.

Goals and strategies for teaching physical education

Goals and strategies for teaching physical education

How to design & teach using outcomes Download PDF EPUB FB2

Aims to help busy professionals design, develop and deliver a course, from module outline to effective teaching. Illustrated with useful checklists and action points, this book covers the essentials of designing learning: supporting and promoting student learning matching content to outcomes selecting effective teaching and learning methodsFile Size: 1MB.

Typical learning outcomes for a module might map onto Bloom’s hierarchy, indicating the development of learning over the course of the module.

Make sure your module is constructively aligned (the learner actively constructs their own understanding and all teaching and assessment is aligned with the intended outcomes). Developing Learning Outcomes. Learning outcomes are user-friendly statements that tell students what they will be able to do at the end of a period of are measurable and quite often ng outcomes are usually discussed within the context of program-wide assessment, but they can be valuable components of any class because of the way they sharpen the focus on.

Measurable Outcomes. This can work very well for teachers who need to provide measurable outcomes in their classes. Because the outcomes are pre-planned and acceptable evidence of these outcomes is decided well ahead of time, teachers no longer have to teach a set of materials or course books and the devise a way to test what they hope they have taught.

Clarity of focus (having specific outcomes gives a strong sense of purpose to everything teachers and students do). Design down, deliver up (when planning How to design & teach using outcomes book, educators start with the outcomes and work backwards; when planning instruction, teachers teach what students need to learn to demonstrate the outcomes).

Learning outcomes should outline the most central and essential elements of a particular course or program. They will also shape assessment. As such, the process of developing learning outcomes offers an opportunity for reflection on what is most necessary to help learners gain this knowledge and these skills.

Considering (1) key words for the course, [ ]. The design of learning plans ranges from very spontaneous and unfolding to very planful and orderly. However, for the sake of clarity when describing the typical contents of a learning plan, it might be helpful to reference one example of a format of a learning plan.

Let's use this example. In the example, the. Student learning outcomes identify what students will be able to do after a lesson. Basically, outcomes are the product of the learning process.

Effective lessons will ensure student learning using measurable, observable proof as evidence that learning took place. Students' mastery or non-mastery of the content is evident in the actual product.

Therefore, planning lessons with the. Whenever possible, use a variety of approaches, taking into account that students use a diverse range of learning preferences. Plan to use teaching methods that will require and measure active student learning.

Determine how you will evaluate student learning: Plan assignments and exams. Evaluation must go hand-in-hand with course goals. assessment; authentic assessment; open book exams; Here are some tips for designing a good open book exam.

Make it about what students do. The key to open book exams is to set questions where students need to do things with the information they have at hand, rather than simply locating it in the text or notes during the exam and reproducing it.

Try to make things students do in. I cannot say enough about how much I adore their book, and I have written several posts on my personal blog about it. Ariel Sacks uses three levels of questioning: literal, inferential, and critical.

Chris Lehman and Kate Robert write about Lens, Patterns, and Understanding in Falling in Love with Close Reading.

It doesn’t matter which method you use to help your students to understand and. Good learning outcomes are focused on what the learner will know or be able to do by the end of a defined period of time and indicate how that knowledge or skill will be demonstrated.

Upon completing this assignment, students will be able to provide accurate diagrams of. Determine learning objectives. Decide what you want students to get out of the course as a whole and out of each individual unit. These outcomes should be explicitly stated to the students and guide your development of the content.

Start with objectives for individual : 22K. Here are some ready-to-go lessons and activities for you to use in your classroom, each from an outstanding professional book for teaching vocabulary. Words for BEGINNERS (Grades 3–6), from Vocabulary Word of the Day Even if your students are beginning Word Watchers, they will have fun learning synonyms for “beginner.”.

How to Plan an Online English Teaching Lesson. Creating and executing your online teaching lessons will go much smoother if you are prepared.

Winging it for 25 minutes in front of the camera won’t be very fun for you or your students, so make sure you. • Create and share in entirely new ways • Teach and learn through doing and exploring • Accommodate individual learning needs • Focus on outcomes, not technology In this e-book, we’ll first explore the global education challenges facing us today.

Then we’ll dive into these four strategies for creating optimum learning experience. Rebecca encourages them to use a variety of teaching strategies for diverse learning needs.

Using Curriculum Creator, a Web-based tool developed at Appalachia Educational Laboratory, teachers apply her curriculum mapping process to design instructional units. They create learning activities and assessments and link them to specific state standards.

other traditional teaching strategies rather than using active learning teach-ing strategies include the following: 1. If I spend time in class on active learning exercises, I will never get through the health education content that I am expected to cover.

If I do not lecture, I will lose control of the class. Bring pedagogy and cognitive science to online learning environments Online Teaching at Its Best: A Merger of Instructional Design with Teaching and Learning Research is the scholarly resource for online learning that faculty, instructional designers, and administrators have long been awaiting.

Over 70 percent of degree-granting institutions offer online classes, and while technical resources. Octo Lesson Design Using the ‘BOPPPS’ Model – Part 2: Intended Learning Outcomes. Hello SJSU Community. It’s Dr. Rayna Friendly again. In a previous post, I introduced a model of lesson design that I learned during my graduate degree, that is taught in the Instructional Skills Workshop (ISW), which has been run in more than academic institutions worldwide (Day, ).

Consistency in use of this format is helpful, because it enhances predictability for both students and teachers, and also facilitates design and use of learning objectives in practice (see ‘Examples of SMART learning objectives’).

SMART is an acronym outlining key. “This book is written for all who teach, and especially for those who have chosen to teach in a hybrid learning format. It is a practical handbook about outcomes-based practice applied to hybrid design to use when designing and teaching a hybrid course.”. - The easiest way to create and manage your lessons online, developed by teachers for teachers.

The learning outcomes in Te Whāriki bring together the big ideas on valued learning for children in relation to the principles, strands, and particularly the goals, of the curriculum. The learning outcomes are underpinned by current New Zealand and international evidence on the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and dispositions children need to learn and thrive.

Using THE ACME PAYROLL SYSTEM AND A JOB AID, EDIT THIS WEEKS TIME CARDS. If a user (learner in instructional design terms) can perform this test and pass it then the course passes it’s UAT and can be released (published) much like a new software feature can be released once it has passed UAT.

Design a Plan for the Project Create a Schedule Monitor the Students and the Progress of the Project Assess the Outcome Evaluate the Experience Start with the Essential Question The question that will launch a PBL lesson must be one that will engage your students.

It is greater than the task at hand. It is open ended. The few example activities above show how class reader lessons can now easily encompass a range of skills using e-books.

The focus must remain on the learner’s language outcomes, and the activities must be kept technologically simple. Also, don't forget that e-book readers are, of course, great for promoting extensive reading too.

This section describes The Creative Curriculum® for Preschool’s impact on child outcomes as a result of using the curriculum for two years. It includes a discussion of (1) research questions and the overall study design, (2) the training and coaching plan, (3) data collection measures and procedures, and (4) a summary of the findings.

write clear objectives which define the specific outcomes or competencies to be achieved in terms of skills, knowledge, attitudes or values, 2. form the basis upon which to select or design instruction materials, content or teaching techniques, 3.

provide the basis for determining or assessing when the instruction purpose has been. An overview of the Edutopia professional development guide for teaching how to use project-based learning in the classroom.

Octo 's Project-Based Learning professional development guide can be used for a two- to three-hour session, or expanded for a one- to two-day workshop, and is divided into two parts. Effective teaching involves acquiring relevant knowledge about students and using that knowledge to inform our course design and classroom teaching.

When we teach, we do not just teach the content, we teach students the content. A variety of student characteristics can affect learning. The course design can be summed up by the answers to four key teaching questions: 1. What learning outcomes do you want your students to achieve (intellectual, social, practical and personal) as a result of taking your course.

How will your course help your students achieve these learning outcomes. Many school districts provide lesson-plan books, while others allow teachers to develop their own format.

Regardless of the format, here are the key components of successful lesson planning: Your lessons should be readable and detailed enough that a substitute teacher could teach.

book is written to help people study the Bible to understand its message. Then this book will help them go a step further: it will help them share its message with others. Therefore, this could be the second-most important book you’ve ever read because it will help you understand and teach the Bible-most important book in the world.

Learning outcomes not only serve the purpose of directing the content and design of a unit of study, they form the basis of assessment and are also linked to the larger outcomes of learning set by the University in the form of generic and/or course/discipline-specific graduate attributes.

An outcomes-based approach presents a range of advantages for those who teach and design courses in higher education. For example, they bring clarity, precision and transparency to curriculum design, teaching practice and assessment.

The shift to learning outcomes opens course design to better curriculum alignment and accountability in. Optional: Students will be writing autobiographies using the worksheets and writing prompts completed throughout the lesson.

If you have the time, have students compile the worksheets and decorate them with illustrations to create scrapbooks of their lives.

The scrapbooks may help students organize their writing in the next step. The purpose of instructional objectives and performance outcomes is to define the type of learning that will occur at the conclusion of instruction and how learning will be assessed.

Both objectives and performance outcomes should be written as precisely as possible in order to best determine whether they have been achieved.

Wherever possible, plan the assessment, including full details of each assessment task, at the time the course outline is initially developed, so that learning outcomes can be seen to be assessable and achievable within the timeframe of the course.

Often, learning outcomes are framed well in advance of detailed assessment plans—for example, to accord with professional accreditation requirements.

This point is consistent with other research in the field that has noted that talk during parent–child interactions with e-books often focuses on the technology skills needed to use the book (e.g., swiping to turn a page) instead of on the content of the book (Parish-Morris, Mahajan, Hirsh-Pasek, & Golinkoff, ), as well as our.

All learners need teaching strategies which arouse the unique interest and curiosity to learn. The use of real-life applications and asking stimulating openended questions - enhance the learning experience for all students.

Today, the challenges of teaching a diverse student population are at the forefront of all education initiatives nationwide.Eberly Center › Design & Teach a Course Many of the decisions affecting the success of a course take place well before the first day of class.

Careful planning at the course design stage not only makes teaching easier and more enjoyable, it also facilitates student learning.The Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (link) is a useful resource for crafting learning objectives that are demonstrable and measurable Plan the specific learning activities.

When planning learning activities you should consider the types of activities students will need to engage in, in order to develop the skills and knowledge required to demonstrate effective learning.